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Doc. British Council

Music is a vital part of our cultural life. The rapid development of the music landscape in Indonesia has elevated the sector to be increasingly recognized by the world as a value for economic growth that supports creative and skilled jobs, tourism, and a thriving night-time economy. It also shows that the Indonesian music sector can thrive rapidly due to the existence of an independent ethos from the relevant industry players.

About the Research

This research aims to map the development of the music industry’s landscape in Indonesia which will then be used to explore the right model to help music practitioners. With this research, the British Council will be able to provide maximum support to the sector through an understanding of the overall music ecosystem in Indonesia.

Three cities were chosen as comparative case studies that are influencing and representative of the growing music sector: Bandung, Jakarta, and Denpasar. This research helps to identify the needs of the music sector development for each place and measures that will enhance an inclusive approach to growth in the sector. 

A summary of the research can be downloaded through the link at the end of this page. 

Contact us at arts@britishcouncil.or.id and Olla.Mazaya@britishcouncil.or.id should you need the document in another format. 

Research Discussion

During the launching of our research on Indonesia’s independent music ecology, we coordinated a discussion via YouTube Live which involved music practitioners, policy practitioner, and a representative of creative space. This discussion was part of the #CultureConnectsUs Festival which was held last Saturday, May 16, 2020.

Moderator: 

Nuran Wibisono (Music Journalist of Tirto.id)

Pemateri: 

- Idhar Resmadi (Lecturer at Telkom University, Writer, and Appointed Researcher for British Council's Music Research) 

- Wendi Putranto (Manager of Seringai & M-Bloc Space)  

- Nadia Yustina (Founder of Amity Asia Agency) 

- Hafez Gumay (Policy Researcher at Koalisi Seni Indonesia) 

The recorded discussion is still available to watch in British Council Indonesia's Youtube Channel or at the bottom of this page.